Technological Advances That Herald A Renaissance in Peptide Drug Discovery

October 15, 2020 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Webinar, click "live-stream" button to view

Add to Calendar 10/15/2020 11:00:56 AM 10/15/2020 12:00:56 PM Technological Advances That Herald A Renaissance in Peptide Drug Discovery

This forum will cover the area of therapeutic peptides and provide historical perspectives including the ups and downs of the field, current development trends, and future directions. We’ll discuss the role of artificial intelligence and machine learning in expanding the landscape of peptide drug discovery opportunities. And we’ll present a case study on targeting Pannexin 1 channels in disease. Questions are welcomed throughout the presentations and panel discussion.

Sponsored by the MassBio Drug Discovery forum working group.

NOTE: MassBio makes every effort to accommodate our entire community at each of our events. Please let us know at least 3 days in advance of the event if you require special accommodations, such as captioning.

Webinar, click "live-stream" button to view

This forum will cover the area of therapeutic peptides and provide historical perspectives including the ups and downs of the field, current development trends, and future directions. We’ll discuss the role of artificial intelligence and machine learning in expanding the landscape of peptide drug discovery opportunities. And we’ll present a case study on targeting Pannexin 1 channels in disease. Questions are welcomed throughout the presentations and panel discussion.

Sponsored by the MassBio Drug Discovery forum working group.

NOTE: MassBio makes every effort to accommodate our entire community at each of our events. Please let us know at least 3 days in advance of the event if you require special accommodations, such as captioning.

Associate Professor, The University of Western Ontario
Dr. Penuela's lab is interested in the study of a novel family of channel-forming proteins, called Pannexins (Panx1, Panx2 and Panx3) that were discovered in the last decade based on their similarity to the invertebrate innexins. Although they were originally thought to be another family of gap junction proteins, we have established that their primary function is to form single membrane channels for release and uptake of ions and large molecules, such as ATP, involved in paracrine signaling. Pannexins are very important for cellular communication and are involved in early developmental events in many systems, including skin, cartilage, bone, vasculature and central nervous system, where they regulate proliferation and differentiation of different cell types. However, when expressed in adult tissues, pannexins can also have detrimental effects, for instance, facilitating cell death under ischemic conditions and malignant transformation in melanomas.